Making Your CV Stand Out

A thorough CV check

Your CV is often the first glimpse a prospective employer or recruiter will gain when it comes to the ins and outs of your professional life. Use your CV as your chance to stand out and showcase your skills and abilities.

Format and design may vary between industries and personal preference, but if you take the time to tailor your CV to every role you apply for and follow our golden rules, your CV should be finding its way to the top of the pile.

  • Contact Information

It’s essential to include your contact details on your CV, without these how will employers get hold of you? A phone number and email address should be the minimum – but make sure your email is professional, when it comes to your CV first impressions really do count.

  • Headline

Your CV should start with a short statement that outlines who you are and exactly what you can offer. Highlight your skills and attributes that you can bring to the job. This is your chance to sell yourself as the perfect candidate for the role.

  • Previous Employment

Write in reverse chronological order of your previous places of work. Include concise details of what the job entailed and the skills you learnt – relate these to the job you are applying for to show you are more than capable. Generally, it is better to include more detail in recent positions.

  • Spelling and Grammar

Do a thorough CV check for spelling mistakes and grammatical errors. Get a friend to do a CV check in case you have missed anything as a simple spelling error can be costly.

  • Up-to-date

It is better to keep your CV up to date then to include gaps leaving employers to wonder why and what you have been doing. Review your CV on a regular basis with a CV check to add in any skills or experience you may have gained.

  • Skills

Tailor your CV for every role you apply to. Focus on the skills, experience and qualifications you have that relate best to the job you’re applying for.

  • Pictures

A good rule is to leave a picture off your CV, if you really think that it is required then make sure you choose a professional picture – the same goes for your LinkedIn profile!

  • Font and Format

Whilst you want your CV to stand out from the crowd it is best to keep to an easily readable format with uniform text and minimal colour. If you work in more of a creative industry where you want to showcase your design skills, then a separate portfolio could be supplied.

  • Achievements

Employers want to understand the value that a potential employee can bring. By stating clear and quantifiable achievements it can help to make your CV stand out. These can be put at the top of your CV or as a sub header on your different positions.

  • Length

One of the biggest CV turn-offs we hear from employers is an overly lengthy CV. The key to CV length is to tailor it to your experience – a CV of 1 or 2 pages in length for a graduate may be right, however there is nothing wrong with a CV of 3 to 4 pages for a seasoned professional.


Punctuation Rules

The basics

Punctuation marks are symbols which organise the structure of written language, and indicate intonation and pauses to be observed when reading. Punctuation marks are also used for clarity and to avoid ambiguity. Eg. “woman, without her man, is nothing” has a different meaning from “woman: without her, man is nothing”…

This is a summary of some basic punctuation rules:

  • Full stop, or period (.)

A full stop is used at the end of a sentence:
She stood up and went away. She was furious.

It is also commonly used for abbreviations:
Co. (Company)
M.P. (Member of Parliament)

  • Question Marks (?)

Question marks are used at the end of direct questions:
Where do you live?
Are you crazy?
Did you do the homework?

They are also used at the end of tag questions:
You will help me, won’t you?
He likes soccer, doesn’t he?

  • Exclamation marks (!)

Used to indicate strong emotions:
She’s so beautiful!
What a nice girl!
How interesting!

Also used after interjections
Oh! It’s awful.
Hi! What’s up?

  • Commas (,)

Commas are used between items in a series or list. The last two items of the series usually do not need a comma between them. They are separated by “and”.
I like spaghetti, fish, pizza, and couscous.

Commas are also used between adjectives or adverbs:
I’d like to have a big, German car.
She speaks slowly, quietly and eloquently.

After the street address and city, in an address:
83 Ducie Street, Manchester.

Before or after direct speech:
He said, “I hate being treated like that.”
“I’m sorry,” she replied.

Before a coordinating conjunction (for, and, but, or yet, so).
He woke up late, so he had to drive to work.

  • Semicolons (;)

Semicolons are used instead of a full stop or period to separate independent sentences:
They woke up early; then they went jogging.

Use a semicolon to separate items in a series when those items contain punctuation such as a comma:
They visited the Eiffel Tower, Paris; Big Ben, London; and the statue of liberty, New York.

  • Colons (:)

Use a colon to introduce a list:
He visited three cities last summer holiday: Madrid, Roma and Athens.

To introduce an idea or an explanation:
He had one idea in mind: to see her as soon as possible.

To introduce direct speech or a quotation:
The secretary whispered in his ear: “Your wife is on the phone,”

  • Dashes (-)

To introduce parenthetical information:
I put on a blue jacket – the one my mother bought me – and blue jeans.

To show an afterthought:
I explained to him my point of view – at least I tried!

  • Apostrophes (‘)

Use an apostrophe to indicate a missing letter or letters in a contraction.
I’m fed up with his stories.
Use an apostrophe plus the letter “s” to show possession.
My brother’s girlfriend is such a sweet girl.

  • Quotation marks (“ “)

Quotation marks are used to quote speech, sentences or words.
She said, “I love you.”

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Choosing A Dissertation Title

Highlighting your topic

One of the most important steps in the writing process is choosing a a dissertation title that does justice to your work. The title of a dissertation or thesis must do several things in a relatively small number of words. First and most importantly, your title must tell the readers what you are about to discuss at length in a clear and coherent way.

Adding a creative or unique element

Secondly, your title must also include a creative or unique element, something that lets readers know that your personality is present in your work. Classic titles for dissertations or theses typically contain a common punctuation mark used by many academics: the colon. Titles with two phrases separated by a colon allow you to express two sides of your study and to draw readers into your work through information and creativity.

The most important thing to consider when choosing a dissertation title is your personality. Because the body of your work reveals your writing style, you should remain true to your style in your title. Don’t try to write a title that you feel is attractive but that ultimately misleads readers in some way. Most of your colleagues who will be reading your work have professional interests that are similar to your own. Therefore don’t worry about what will draw people outside of your academic circle because most people who come across your thesis or dissertation will likely be researching a similar topic.

  • Divulging Descriptive Information

Your title should clearly and directly report to your readers what the following paper will contain. You do not want to ruin your dissertation or thesis with a sarcastic or misleading title! When choosing words for your title, you should avoid any words with double meanings. Consider what a person searching your title might find. Scholars should never accidentally stumble across your paper when they were looking for something else. Your title should be simple enough to make it easily accessible for someone who is looking for information regarding your topic.

  • Keeping Readers in Mind

Always remember who will be reading your dissertation or thesis. If yours is a work that will only be read by academics, you will need to consider your audience before choosing a catchy or humorous title. For example, a humorous or ironic title might not appeal to the scientific colleagues of a nuclear engineer. However, professors of the arts and humanities might appreciate or even encourage humorous or ironic titles. Lastly, you should never include any terms in your dissertation titles that could be offensive to any group of people for any reason.

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Structuring Your Dissertation

Writing a dissertation for the first time may appear a challenging prospect.  However once broken down into stages it should seem more manageable. The first aspect of this is understanding the basics of structuring your dissertation in the best way possible.  There is a set pattern that should be followed when trying to write a dissertation. The following is a format and style that is often followed when writing a dissertation:

  • Title Page

A clear and good title page should be included.

  • Abstract

The abstract should state the aim of the dissertation, give a brief insight into the main literature that is to be covered. Give a brief overview of the methodology used for the research, a brief indication of what the main findings were, and then a brief outline of what the main conclusion of the research was:

  • Acknowledgement

This should include those who assisted you with the research e.g. companies who have given you access to data and individuals who have helped you. Recognition in this section should not be exhaustive.

  • Table of Contents

This section should list all the headings and sub-headings exactly as they appear in the text. These should also be given page numbers.

  • List of Tables / List of Figures

This page should list all the tables that have appeared in the dissertation. The table number, the table label and the page number should be on this page.

  • Chapter 1 – Introduction

This chapter should show the importance and relevance of your research. An important part of this chapter is to clearly state the aim and objectives of the dissertation. This tells the reader exactly what it is you are trying to achieve. An aim is what you want to achieve overall. Objectives are smaller stepping stones that you take to achieve the aim.

  • Chapter 2 – Literature Review

You are expected to provide a critical review of the existing literature (published and unpublished) on the research topic being studied. It considers the work of theorists in the area and compares their work with others. The purpose of this is to show that you have the ability to examine the literature available and criticise it constructively. It should also show how your ideas are related to previous research related topics to http://www.casinonorske.com/.

  • Chapter 3 – Methodology

This chapter provides detail of the design of the research and the methodological approach taken to do the dissertation. It explains the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ of the research. That is, it reports the methods of investigation.

  • Chapter 4 – Analysis

This chapter should begin with a brief explanation of how results are to be presented. You should break presentation of your results into logical groupings. Much data will be given in the form of tables and graphs.

  • Chapter 5 – Conclusions and Recommendations

This chapter should not contain any new material. Your critical evaluation is seen here – what do you conclude overall from the literature and primary data?

  • References

Full details of all the books and journal articles cited or referenced throughout the dissertation should be included in this section.

  • Appendices

Information contained in the appendices should be considered relevant to the work, but not be too long, detailed or in some form that would interrupt the flow of the work.

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Writing A Compelling Dissertation Abstract

Importance of a dissertation abstract

The dissertation abstract of your research project needs to be well-organised, as you will have a limited word count to convey important information about the research. Keep in mind that a  poorly researched and uninteresting dissertation project will make it harder to engage the reader. Therefore you will need to prepare as thoroughly as possible to prepare a compelling dissertation abstract. Below we will highlight some of the key ingredients of a compelling abstract.

Important ingredients of an abstract
  • An abstract should be based on a more pertinent research summary. Such a summary includes a short statement along with the study significance and objectives;
  • An abstract should have key theories to underpin the dissertation;
  • An abstract should briefly explain the research methodology that would be applied to collect information;
  • An abstract should summarise the study results and findings; and
  • An abstract should have a principal conclusion. The conclusion should be summarised and phrased in such a manner that the readers can easily comprehend the research.

Of course you do not need to use all of these structural components in your dissertation. It will depend on your particular dissertation type and nature. However, all these components are intended to assist you in summarising the main facets of your dissertation.

Types of abstract

There are two types of dissertation abstracts commonly employed: (1) The descriptive abstract and (2) The informative abstract.

  • The descriptive abstract: This type of dissertation abstract includes the data (facts and information) provided inside the whole dissertation. In this abstract, you will have to explain the entire research work along with the study scope. It also has the research purpose and methodology. Typically, descriptive abstracts do not include the study results and findings.
  • The informative abstract: This type of abstract includes the informative details that will be described in detail later. This abstract is based on the information associated with the study scope, aims and purpose and the research methodology. Besides these, an informative abstract also has a brief summary of results and findings.

A dissertation abstract is an important part of a dissertation and sets an important impression for the rest of your research. Thus this section should be prepared in such a way that it captures the readers mind. It should be comprehensive and everything from the introduction, to conclusion and the chapters should be comprehensible for the supervisor. Remember, key information from all chapters should be briefly explained in the abstract in order for the reader to get immediate insight into the nature and scope of your research project.

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Tips For Writer’s Block

Procrastination

1. Try going old school with pen and paper. Sometimes typing on the computer feels intimidating. Old-fashioned pen and paper sometimes helps get the ideas flowing. It switches up our mode of writing from a formalised computer, to a more casual notepad. And with pen and paper, you can draw pictures and create brainstorm webs.

2. Dangle a carrot. Treat yourself once you’ve accomplished your writing goal for the day. Getting that piece of writing done might be just the excuse – or incentive – you needed to purchase a well-earned treat or trip out.

3. Set a time limit. Promise yourself 30 minutes of uninterrupted writing time and set an alarm on your phone. And if you’re on a role after your alarm goes off you may not even want to stop.

4. Take baby steps. Just write the first paragraph – that’s all. Sometimes the hardest part is getting started.

5. Go public. Get up from your bed, desk, or usual writing area and change up your scenery. Getting out of your house and into, say, a coffee shop means that you’re in public and people are expecting you to act civilized. So you’re forced to sit down and write.

6. Use other sections of your writing as inspiration. You may feel intimidated when you compare yourself to others, so instead, compare yourself to yourself. Look at the best sections of your content to be reminded of what an awesome writer you are.

7. Create a physical reminder of your past success. Create a vision board to post on the wall of the room where you write. Or, create a poster with your favourite writing quotes. Draft up a list of all your by-lines, good ideas, or publications you want to write for and use any of those posts for inspiration. Or create a list of places where you’ve been published and stick that on your wall.

8. Create an editorial calendar to hold yourself accountable. Your calendar can then guilt trip you into getting things done on time. If you have a full list of posts to write for the month, you better get started on them now.

9. Become your own therapist. Answer these questions: Why don’t I want to write? What am I afraid of? How do I feel about my writing?

10. Sometimes we writers procrastinate because we are afraid of something: not being good enough, failure etc. Once we shine some light on the reason why we are avoiding writing, we can remind ourselves of our successes and power through.

11. Think about what you will get out of it. Instead of being afraid of failure, or whatever fear is keeping you from writing, think about your goals. Think about how each step brings you closer to your writing goals. Successful people think successful thoughts.


Common Idioms And Their Meanings

English is a complex language with many subtleties and variations. Anyone learning English may find certain phrases that do not mean what they appear to mean confusing at first. Such phrases which are not literal, however are common expressions are known as common idioms. This article will assist you with learning and comprehending the ten most common idioms used in everyday use alongside their intended meanings.

Ten common idioms utilized in everyday expressions:

1. Piece of cake – The ‘piece of cake’ is alluding to something that is simple or possible. You utilize this when you discover that something is simple or easy to carry out.

2. Break a leg – This is one of the common idioms which may sound strange at first, however again it does not mean what it suggests. Break a leg implies good fortunes or wishing luck. It is utilized as a well wish in respect of circumstances that need it.

3. Hit the books – Have you heard local speakers in your class utilize this phrase? If yes, here is what it means. It intends and refers to studying. An example of its use is as follows;

Use: I’m going to rest for the time being. I will most likely hit the books at night.

4. Let the cat out of the bag – Why might anybody put a feline into the sack in any case? Well, stress not; the feline is alright! ‘Let the cat out of the bag’ really intends to uncover a mystery that should be kept a mystery. It is one of the common idioms.

5. Hit the nail on the head – This is utilized to say that the individual is absolutely right.

6. Don’t judge a book by its cover– Sounds confounded; however it gets more straightforward as and when you comprehend it. It basically means do not be judgmental, particularly based on external perceptions.

7. Bite more than you can chew – This is a popular expression that is utilized when a person takes up more obligation than he/she can complete.

8. Hear it from the horse’s mouth – This is one of the major common idioms that means to hear the news straight from the source’s mouth.

9. Speak of the devil– When the individual you have recently been discussing arrives.

10. Feeling under the weather– This phrase is utilized when you feel a bit low because of health issues.

The above list are some of the most common idioms used, there are many more. However you will know now the purposes of idioms and have a better understanding of their intentions.

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How To Carry Out Manuscript Proofreading

Proofreading your manuscript

Proofreading is not basic or simple. Nor should it be done rapidly; manuscript proofreading ought to be continuous all through the whole book writing process. Beginning with altering the introductory draft and until supporting the page proofs-precisely, verifications proofreading is an indispensable step in delivering a quality book.

Text style:

In manuscript proofreading, leave the extravagant text styles. There is no need for an original copy to be composed in diverse text styles or text dimensions. Pick one and simple to peruse textual style and size, Times New Roman 12 is standard. Fancier text styles tend to obscure letters together or have scripts where a few letters are almost unrecognizable.

Utilize the magnifying glass:

Maybe not truly, unless you’re manuscript proofreading on paper, but rather than perusing the original copy at 100% perspective, expand it so it fills the screen-150 or 200% is fitting.

Turn on the invisibles:

Invisibles are every one of the spaces you can’t see on the page. Each time you hit the space bar, which is between each word; your PC system will leave a little spot between the words. It will make a little passage symbol while you hit “return” to begin another section. The invisibles can improve things significantly.

Peruse slowly and multiple times:

Nothing in manuscript proofreading is more critical than perusing gradually. Yes, it can be a bit exhausting, yet a lapse free original copy is justified, despite all the trouble.

Read out loud:

We suggest perusing loudly so everyone can hear amid the editing, you will be amazed by how you can enhance the tone and style by perusing your original copy and you will get subtleties which you would not have gotten before by listening to yourself.

Take a gander at each word and each letter. Giving careful consideration to every word and letter in manuscript proofreading is crucially essential. Numerous creators depend a lot on spell-check. Spell-check won’t catch words that are effectively spelled, however in the wrong place. This procedure is tedious so you likely won’t stay with it for long, yet it is great because it shows starting editors to work slowly and focus.

At long last, do get a second supposition. Edit your work. After it is complete, offer it to another person to edit. Try not to anticipate that the other individual will make it impeccable and after that consider the employment done.